Preface Part I: Being Becoming: Integrative Paradigms For Developmental Metaphysics

BEING BECOMING

NOTES (Part I)

BEING BECOMING: INTEGRATIVE PARADIGMS

CONSTRUCTS FOR INTERDISCIPLINARY ONTOLOGY

Richard Waguespack, Ph.D., LCSW

     Few argue against fuller explanations about what constitutes our being and purpose.  Being Becoming explores the conditions of our essence and potential and dynamics of existence influencing our self-concept, goals, mission, volition, and the way we participate in relationships.  These include marital, family, church, school, workplace and the extended physical, quantum, morphic, metaphysical and spiritual interfaces of our environment.

    Working assumptions in Philosophy, Medicine, Psychology, Social Work, Science, Technology, Business, Sociology and other disciplines are based on variables we think we understand and the meaning, relationships and value we assign to them.  The composition of our being reflects the contingencies between our essence and the potential that extends from it.   The conscious employment of will and volition emerges from our essence and potential which in turn are influenced by our values and the way we integrate perceptions, experiences, consequences and benefits. 

    One interdisciplinary vision of Being Becoming is to attempt to fathom what constitutes the fullness of being so that our approaches to serving others will correspond more holistically to the real conditions of their personhood.  In other words, we need to possess an adequate orientation to help facilitate human development in a way that does the most good and avoids doing harm.  If our criteria for personhood, good or harm are not sufficiently developed because we do not fathom the nature of being, essence, potential, existence and more, then how do we presume to posture ourselves as primary agencies, authorities, gatekeepers, facilitators, therapists, managers, executives and the like?  

    Our quest begins by examining key aspects of physiology with an eye towards integrating a wider range of interacting components than typically demonstrated in conventional scientific models.  Here we consider Ontological and Epistemological implications of being expanding outside a materialist framework to being in Being – a foundation for interpreting our actual makeup, modalities of function, life force, experiences, development, motivations and organization of perceptions.  

    One early goal of this work was to improve the depth, quality and comprehensiveness of working theory that orients the developmental consequences decision making.   I was motivated to introduce a series of paradigms with the power to draw practitioners, researchers, educators and managers to a place where they could no longer casually restrict ‘working assumptions and dialogs’ into materialist’s pet frameworks but would themselves be restricted if the refused recourse and reference to an interdisciplinary framework that respects metaphysics and well sourced spirituality.  The specific rules of logic, reasoning and reframing may depend on the context, but once a construct of knowledge enters a prescribed interdisciplinary conduit, it can no longer retain its protective cocoon or imply an exclusive leading role confined to positivist presumptions. 

    Along with recognizing existence tethered to variables outside of three dimensions, it is also very important to fathom that such an expanded mindset must navigate with the help of Ontological frameworks grounded to the transcendent nature of humankind as well as a foundational ethos supporting well-being – including proper utilization of conscience and intellectual faculties.   We must also understand that broad pastoral explanations, insights and guidelines cannot be ignored and scuttled by the atheist and agnostic if he or she wishes to participate in collaborative work in a leading theaters.

   The Being Becoming Series is in designed to persuasively overcome conceptual impasses binding individual professionals to entrenched biases that are unhealthy, problematic intellectual frameworks that create various kinds of impasses and highly powerful and manipulative reward systems.  It is formulated to revive the potential and quality of  emerging interdisciplinary theory as well as practice in the face of prevailing orientations that may at times be adverse to reasonable integrations within an improved paradigm. 

      With barriers to certain categories of improvement, both upstream and downstream, entrenched systems and wrongful political ideologies tend to create conditions fostering unnecessary double talk, submerged duplicity and other quagmires amongst a wide variety of paradigms in philosophy, science, medicine, education, social service, public health and much more.  Therefore, it is necessary to equip those who wish to improve conditions with high quality insights, approaches, questions and proposals for integrated knowledge that leads to more holistic and trustworthy conversation, mission and purpose.  

      If you have read this far, you are probably quite concerned about the consequences of scientists, health professionals, corporate leaders, technology experts, teachers and administrators remaining in the shallows.  At the same time, you may be looking for examples of historically relevant individuals who were accomplished in the sciences and at the same time were able to reframe their knowledge within quantum, morphic, metaphysical and spiritual domains.  

   A central figure to weigh is 1963 Nobel Laureate in Physiology and Medicine – Sir John Eccles (1903-1997).  If one examines his published works from 1932 (Reflex Activity of the Spinal Cord) to 1994 (How the Self Controls Its Brain), we see a gradual progression towards a view that expands from the strictly physiological to the metaphysical and spiritual dimensions of humankind – including a credible effort in resolving the so called mind – body problem that he interfaces with and extended beyond Cartesian Dualism.   In sum, in this last book, he offered the concept of “Psychons” as metaphysical mental units in interaction with  “Dendrons”, fundamental physical units reflecting bundled formations in the Cerebral Cortex.

     Though Eccles’ work at all stages had a wide audience, it certainly shifted and expanded over time, some in scientific fields found reasons to break ranks after he published Facing Reality: Philosophical Adventures by a Brain Scientist (1970) and continued to pull away as he continued to produce books that pressed for a more comprehensive model of mind-brain.  One of his predecessors, German physicist Friedrich Beck (1927-2008), tended to walk the fence on Eccles’ models, especially after his death, offering neural transmission explanations from the nomenclature and models of quantum physics.  He was primarily known for his “quantum tunneling” interpretation, plausibly stretching outside of three dimensions, but not necessarily. 

     A sense of meaning and purpose cannot be divorced from how one perceives his or her development in the context of being in community.  Indeed, the models and language we use tend to be heavily influenced by our relationships and those who have influence on our lives.  “Validation” received from ‘carrot and stick management strategies’ in the science lab or business focus group, research funding sources and other controlling players with reductionist assumptions may seriously undermine the potential for thorough self-examination, productive self-direction and growth.  They may also cause a given group of people to prostitute their faculties to accomplish research designed to reflect certain implied outcomes rather than coming to terms with a holistic understanding of the truth.  

    The Being Becoming Series offers an understanding of human potential and essence that keeps open the doors of metaphysical and related interfaces.  A developmental model like Waguespack’s Three Essence Theory can help establish working paradigms to help influential players realign baseline assumptions and conversational scope about what makes up the human person.

     Are you aware of certain psychological, medical, scientific, and philosophical modalities of assessing phenomenon, individuals and groups that may currently be considered “mainstream”, but believe the nomenclature and underpinnings shortsighted and reductionist, often suppressing or perverting the potential for optimal growth and the fortification of potentialities, essence(s) and being? As a ’systemic thinker’ are you motivated to consider a presentation purposed to target key areas of philosophy, science, medicine and Theology relevant to becoming whole and helping others to be the best versions of themselves – and at times from harming themselves? 

     Perhaps you have considered integrating material from a wide variety of sources within an effective interdisciplinary synthesis, but have been discouraged by the effort required to credibly integrate the material in a way suitable for public consumption.  Keep in mind that most colleges and universities have opportunities for interdisciplinary studies at every level.  Many have interdisciplinary departments.  This approach has evolved significantly over the past 50 years and will continue to do so.  Welch (2011) explains in his abstract of “The Emergence of Interdisciplinarity From Epistemological Thought”:

–Interdisciplinary studies has positioned itself as an innovative approach to comprehending, navigating, and transforming knowledge. The emphasis in recent scholarship upon complex systems and integration of insights from disciplinary perspectives mark decisive progress toward the development of a cohesive theory of interdisciplinarity. Such a theory would entail establishing an epistemology of complexity through epistemological negotiation. I argue that the interdisciplinary approach to knowledge is a logical evolution of the history of Western thought…(p. 1)–

     He suggests that “such an approach to knowledge requires a metacognitive awareness to the way truth itself is formed” (p. 2) and that complexity has become the cornerstone of interdisciplinary theory (p. 32).  This approach moves away from reducing knowledge to simple structures or idealized models and acknowledges its dependence on context, focusing on relationships between systemic elements (p. 32).  He points out Derrida who suggests that “différance enables complexity itself, and allows for the possibility of epistemological progress without ignoring the way in which it problematizes itself” (p. 33).  

      Developments in the neurosciences, chemistry, physics, math, technology, computer science, database management and engineering possess greater and greater magnitude in their social and environmental ramifications — for good or for ill.  The theoretical underpinnings and sometimes troubled dynamics within these venues as well as many areas of medicine, management and human resources often signal an increased need for interdisciplinary checks, balances and cooperation.  This work strives to offer a common nomenclature with the potential to increase unification across these diverse fields without diminishing the importance or quality of production of any given discipline.

     The interdisciplinary synthesis of this Series offers a very wide range of content relevant for linking and expanding standard paradigms to highly relevant dimensions of physiology as it may be interfaced with, quantum, morphic, metaphysical and spiritual realms. My hope is to draw our minds towards making room for notions that expand conventional physiology without giving undue weight to any sphere of influence.  The issues may often come down determining how much weight should be afforded a given concept, construct, theory or paradigm in the overall schema.  This is why modern epistemology cannot be totally divorced from consensus building and some level of negotiation, not for the sake of negotiation, but for the sake of better clarifying the limitations and merit of any given representation at any given interval in any given context.

      Many are responding to invitations to reexamine what their professions are evidently conveying and not conveying to themselves and those they serve.  In some instances, critiquing what they do not recognize and fortify can be almost as important as examining what they do.  For example, if a group of social workers in a conference on domestic violence appear to give inordinate weight to the notion of “rights” and situational problem solving via dissolution of marriage within a radically feminist schema of service and gatekeeping, then society at large has a problem and there is probably no effective recourse in singling out one or two people for correction or disciplinary action.   How does society respond to subgroups of professionals who tend to grossly discount the relative value of marriage and family preservation and radically overweigh their angry sentiments against males with impoverish backgrounds or otherwise, trapped in cycles of abusive behavior towards spouses. 

   Blind spots, cognitive distortions, group think and problematic approaches found in disciplines administrated in relative isolation or in reference to wrongful collective assumptions can often be exposed and remedied through constructive interdisciplinary dialog fortified with concepts generated from “the outside”.  Ideally, such exchanges will help set the stage for improvements emerging from “the inside” as well.   Often the process and outcomes will not be formally established and explicitly rectified, but graduated in the context of mutually beneficial interdisciplinary and more constructive internal dialogs.

   Each venue of professional life presents a unique set of challenges that relates to needs, opportunities as well as various types of suppression.  The most general is human resources. It is rather basic to understand incentives for management to orchestrate work conditions that facilitate outcomes of reliable, effective and efficient productivity.  Many have demonstrably understood and responded to the need to encourage holistic lifestyles with sufficient private reflection, time with family and recreation.  These accommodations have certainly been instrumental in helping large numbers of employees function in accordance with the expectations of management. 

    What is especially critical to spot are sources that inform and perhaps rank higher but who are themselves questionable leaders alienating the wrong people and promoting the wrong people.  Of course, the “right” and “wrong” relates to the mission and values of the organization.   At times one must recognize where the most pivotal shortcomings are as well as their systemic effects.  Sometimes the remedies and corrections are not straight forward but must be implemented within a larger strategy for the good of the organization.  When might it be appropriate to change the vision and mission of an organization and when is it critical to hold onto it at almost any cost?  How does one go about examining and challenging a given set of assumptions, often part of the culture but difficult to identify and articulate in a way which would draw consensus and validation of finding(s)?

    Critical paradigm shifts are taking place, but progress is uneven and unpredictable, with much resistance. American physicist and philosopher Thomas Kuhn (1922-1996), the man who coined the term “paradigm” in the 1960s did so in order to describe contexts and frameworks associated with scientific revolutions throughout history. In our time, the revolution pertains to the philosophical and scientific challenge of merging the best of each discipline towards a progressive interdisciplinary synthesis that goes beyond science per se. It is about science recognizing its place and proper role in the scheme of mankind’s development.  Similarly it may be about an organization coming to terms with its existence and criteria for optimal future development.

    We choose our scientific research and define the questions it is supposed to answer.  We establish mission statements for rehabilitating mental illness or corporate dysfunction, often with very specific goals in mind.  “What else” are we and those we interface with  attempting to establish and accomplish?  The “facts” are often going to be assembled within these paradigms and they may not necessarily reflect the most conscious awareness or objective reality –  remote configurations beyond our grasp.  How can we narrow the gap?

    At this point in the history and philosophy of science and other related venues, we are often offered perspectives that suggest reality often accommodates or even resembles the fabric of our individual and collective beliefs, motivations, plans and actions.  Through manifestations of being, we influence the pathways of particles, give life or death vibes to plants and even ice crystals.   The lasting impression most of us have is that the smartest and wisest among us are limited human beings who have made excellent cases for their impressions, perceptions, inferences and beliefs.  In virtually every case, the sands of time have worn down at least some of what they offered and often they have been found inadequate or have been quietly forgotten.

      How often do we look at the big picture on a philosophical level, really studying and thinking deeply?  How often do we ‘strategically modify’ our orientations to “adapt” to the expectations of individuals who themselves are not well invested in an optimal mission or purpose in their own leadership?  This book offers a number of windows, as remote as prime matter and as close to home as conscience to better understand and construct a model of ourselves and those we serve — what are we about anyway?  What are we made of and how do we best develop?  What should be our own “developmental agendas” and those we affirm in others? 

END OF NOTES PART I OF 2

Please note that this book contains a “working Glossary” for the reader to glance through before and during reading…

GO TO NOTES PART 2 of 2

“Interdisciplinary studies has positioned itself as an innovative approach to comprehending, navigating, and transforming knowledge. The emphasis in recent scholarship upon complex systems and integration of insights from disciplinary perspectives mark decisive progress toward the development of a cohesive theory of interdisciplinarity. Such a theory would entail establishing an epistemology of complexity through epistemological negotiation. I argue that the interdisciplinary approach to knowledge is a logical evolution of the history of Western thought…(p. 1).”

Welch (2011).  The Emergence of Interdisciplinarity From Epistemological Thought.  Issues in Integrative Studies. No. 29, pp. 1-39.  

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Web Conferencing

 

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Preface Part I: Being Becoming: Integrative Paradigms For Developmental Metaphysics

BEING BECOMING

NOTES (Part I)

BEING BECOMING: INTEGRATIVE PARADIGMS

CONSTRUCTS FOR INTERDISCIPLINARY ONTOLOGY

Richard Waguespack, Ph.D., LCSW

     Few argue against fuller explanations about what constitutes our being and purpose.  Being Becoming explores the conditions of our essence and potential and dynamics of existence influencing our self-concept, goals, mission, volition, and the way we participate in relationships.  These include marital, family, church, school, workplace and the extended physical, quantum, morphic, metaphysical and spiritual interfaces of our environment.

    Working assumptions in Philosophy, Medicine, Psychology, Social Work, Science, Technology, Business, Sociology and other disciplines are based on variables we think we understand and the meaning, relationships and value we assign to them.  The composition of our being reflects the contingencies between our essence and the potential that extends from it.   The conscious employment of will and volition emerges from our essence and potential which in turn are influenced by our values and the way we integrate perceptions, experiences, consequences and benefits. 

    One interdisciplinary vision of Being Becoming is to attempt to fathom what constitutes the fullness of being so that our approaches to serving others will correspond more holistically to the real conditions of their personhood.  In other words, we need to possess an adequate orientation to help facilitate human development in a way that does the most good and avoids doing harm.  If our criteria for personhood, good or harm are not sufficiently developed because we do not fathom the nature of being, essence, potential, existence and more, then how do we presume to posture ourselves as primary agencies, authorities, gatekeepers, facilitators, therapists, managers, executives and the like?  

    Our quest begins by examining key aspects of physiology with an eye towards integrating a wider range of interacting components than typically demonstrated in conventional scientific models.  Here we consider Ontological and Epistemological implications of being expanding outside a materialist framework to being in Being – a foundation for interpreting our actual makeup, modalities of function, life force, experiences, development, motivations and organization of perceptions.  

    One early goal of this work was to improve the depth, quality and comprehensiveness of working theory that orients the developmental consequences decision making.   I was motivated to introduce a series of paradigms with the power to draw practitioners, researchers, educators and managers to a place where they could no longer casually restrict ‘working assumptions and dialogs’ into materialist’s pet frameworks but would themselves be restricted if the refused recourse and reference to an interdisciplinary framework that respects metaphysics and well sourced spirituality.  The specific rules of logic, reasoning and reframing may depend on the context, but once a construct of knowledge enters a prescribed interdisciplinary conduit, it can no longer retain its protective cocoon or imply an exclusive leading role confined to positivist presumptions. 

    Along with recognizing existence tethered to variables outside of three dimensions, it is also very important to fathom that such an expanded mindset must navigate with the help of Ontological frameworks grounded to the transcendent nature of humankind as well as a foundational ethos supporting well-being – including proper utilization of conscience and intellectual faculties.   We must also understand that broad pastoral explanations, insights and guidelines cannot be ignored and scuttled by the atheist and agnostic if he or she wishes to participate in collaborative work in a leading theaters.

   The Being Becoming Series is in designed to persuasively overcome conceptual impasses binding individual professionals to entrenched biases that are unhealthy, problematic intellectual frameworks that create various kinds of impasses and highly powerful and manipulative reward systems.  It is formulated to revive the potential and quality of  emerging interdisciplinary theory as well as practice in the face of prevailing orientations that may at times be adverse to reasonable integrations within an improved paradigm. 

      With barriers to certain categories of improvement, both upstream and downstream, entrenched systems and wrongful political ideologies tend to create conditions fostering unnecessary double talk, submerged duplicity and other quagmires amongst a wide variety of paradigms in philosophy, science, medicine, education, social service, public health and much more.  Therefore, it is necessary to equip those who wish to improve conditions with high quality insights, approaches, questions and proposals for integrated knowledge that leads to more holistic and trustworthy conversation, mission and purpose.  

      If you have read this far, you are probably quite concerned about the consequences of scientists, health professionals, corporate leaders, technology experts, teachers and administrators remaining in the shallows.  At the same time, you may be looking for examples of historically relevant individuals who were accomplished in the sciences and at the same time were able to reframe their knowledge within quantum, morphic, metaphysical and spiritual domains.  

   A central figure to weigh is 1963 Nobel Laureate in Physiology and Medicine – Sir John Eccles (1903-1997).  If one examines his published works from 1932 (Reflex Activity of the Spinal Cord) to 1994 (How the Self Controls Its Brain), we see a gradual progression towards a view that expands from the strictly physiological to the metaphysical and spiritual dimensions of humankind – including a credible effort in resolving the so called mind – body problem that he interfaces with and extended beyond Cartesian Dualism.   In sum, in this last book, he offered the concept of “Psychons” as metaphysical mental units in interaction with  “Dendrons”, fundamental physical units reflecting bundled formations in the Cerebral Cortex.

     Though Eccles’ work at all stages had a wide audience, it certainly shifted and expanded over time, some in scientific fields found reasons to break ranks after he published Facing Reality: Philosophical Adventures by a Brain Scientist (1970) and continued to pull away as he continued to produce books that pressed for a more comprehensive model of mind-brain.  One of his predecessors, German physicist Friedrich Beck (1927-2008), tended to walk the fence on Eccles’ models, especially after his death, offering neural transmission explanations from the nomenclature and models of quantum physics.  He was primarily known for his “quantum tunneling” interpretation, plausibly stretching outside of three dimensions, but not necessarily. 

     A sense of meaning and purpose cannot be divorced from how one perceives his or her development in the context of being in community.  Indeed, the models and language we use tend to be heavily influenced by our relationships and those who have influence on our lives.  “Validation” received from ‘carrot and stick management strategies’ in the science lab or business focus group, research funding sources and other controlling players with reductionist assumptions may seriously undermine the potential for thorough self-examination, productive self-direction and growth.  They may also cause a given group of people to prostitute their faculties to accomplish research designed to reflect certain implied outcomes rather than coming to terms with a holistic understanding of the truth.  

    The Being Becoming Series offers an understanding of human potential and essence that keeps open the doors of metaphysical and related interfaces.  A developmental model like Waguespack’s Three Essence Theory can help establish working paradigms to help influential players realign baseline assumptions and conversational scope about what makes up the human person.

     Are you aware of certain psychological, medical, scientific, and philosophical modalities of assessing phenomenon, individuals and groups that may currently be considered “mainstream”, but believe the nomenclature and underpinnings shortsighted and reductionist, often suppressing or perverting the potential for optimal growth and the fortification of potentialities, essence(s) and being? As a ’systemic thinker’ are you motivated to consider a presentation purposed to target key areas of philosophy, science, medicine and Theology relevant to becoming whole and helping others to be the best versions of themselves – and at times from harming themselves? 

     Perhaps you have considered integrating material from a wide variety of sources within an effective interdisciplinary synthesis, but have been discouraged by the effort required to credibly integrate the material in a way suitable for public consumption.  Keep in mind that most colleges and universities have opportunities for interdisciplinary studies at every level.  Many have interdisciplinary departments.  This approach has evolved significantly over the past 50 years and will continue to do so.  Welch (2011) explains in his abstract of “The Emergence of Interdisciplinarity From Epistemological Thought”:

–Interdisciplinary studies has positioned itself as an innovative approach to comprehending, navigating, and transforming knowledge. The emphasis in recent scholarship upon complex systems and integration of insights from disciplinary perspectives mark decisive progress toward the development of a cohesive theory of interdisciplinarity. Such a theory would entail establishing an epistemology of complexity through epistemological negotiation. I argue that the interdisciplinary approach to knowledge is a logical evolution of the history of Western thought…(p. 1)–

     He suggests that “such an approach to knowledge requires a metacognitive awareness to the way truth itself is formed” (p. 2) and that complexity has become the cornerstone of interdisciplinary theory (p. 32).  This approach moves away from reducing knowledge to simple structures or idealized models and acknowledges its dependence on context, focusing on relationships between systemic elements (p. 32).  He points out Derrida who suggests that “différance enables complexity itself, and allows for the possibility of epistemological progress without ignoring the way in which it problematizes itself” (p. 33).  

      Developments in the neurosciences, chemistry, physics, math, technology, computer science, database management and engineering possess greater and greater magnitude in their social and environmental ramifications — for good or for ill.  The theoretical underpinnings and sometimes troubled dynamics within these venues as well as many areas of medicine, management and human resources often signal an increased need for interdisciplinary checks, balances and cooperation.  This work strives to offer a common nomenclature with the potential to increase unification across these diverse fields without diminishing the importance or quality of production of any given discipline.

     The interdisciplinary synthesis of this Series offers a very wide range of content relevant for linking and expanding standard paradigms to highly relevant dimensions of physiology as it may be interfaced with, quantum, morphic, metaphysical and spiritual realms. My hope is to draw our minds towards making room for notions that expand conventional physiology without giving undue weight to any sphere of influence.  The issues may often come down determining how much weight should be afforded a given concept, construct, theory or paradigm in the overall schema.  This is why modern epistemology cannot be totally divorced from consensus building and some level of negotiation, not for the sake of negotiation, but for the sake of better clarifying the limitations and merit of any given representation at any given interval in any given context.

      Many are responding to invitations to reexamine what their professions are evidently conveying and not conveying to themselves and those they serve.  In some instances, critiquing what they do not recognize and fortify can be almost as important as examining what they do.  For example, if a group of social workers in a conference on domestic violence appear to give inordinate weight to the notion of “rights” and situational problem solving via dissolution of marriage within a radically feminist schema of service and gatekeeping, then society at large has a problem and there is probably no effective recourse in singling out one or two people for correction or disciplinary action.   How does society respond to subgroups of professionals who tend to grossly discount the relative value of marriage and family preservation and radically overweigh their angry sentiments against males with impoverish backgrounds or otherwise, trapped in cycles of abusive behavior towards spouses. 

   Blind spots, cognitive distortions, group think and problematic approaches found in disciplines administrated in relative isolation or in reference to wrongful collective assumptions can often be exposed and remedied through constructive interdisciplinary dialog fortified with concepts generated from “the outside”.  Ideally, such exchanges will help set the stage for improvements emerging from “the inside” as well.   Often the process and outcomes will not be formally established and explicitly rectified, but graduated in the context of mutually beneficial interdisciplinary and more constructive internal dialogs.

   Each venue of professional life presents a unique set of challenges that relates to needs, opportunities as well as various types of suppression.  The most general is human resources. It is rather basic to understand incentives for management to orchestrate work conditions that facilitate outcomes of reliable, effective and efficient productivity.  Many have demonstrably understood and responded to the need to encourage holistic lifestyles with sufficient private reflection, time with family and recreation.  These accommodations have certainly been instrumental in helping large numbers of employees function in accordance with the expectations of management. 

    What is especially critical to spot are sources that inform and perhaps rank higher but who are themselves questionable leaders alienating the wrong people and promoting the wrong people.  Of course, the “right” and “wrong” relates to the mission and values of the organization.   At times one must recognize where the most pivotal shortcomings are as well as their systemic effects.  Sometimes the remedies and corrections are not straight forward but must be implemented within a larger strategy for the good of the organization.  When might it be appropriate to change the vision and mission of an organization and when is it critical to hold onto it at almost any cost?  How does one go about examining and challenging a given set of assumptions, often part of the culture but difficult to identify and articulate in a way which would draw consensus and validation of finding(s)?

    Critical paradigm shifts are taking place, but progress is uneven and unpredictable, with much resistance. American physicist and philosopher Thomas Kuhn (1922-1996), the man who coined the term “paradigm” in the 1960s did so in order to describe contexts and frameworks associated with scientific revolutions throughout history. In our time, the revolution pertains to the philosophical and scientific challenge of merging the best of each discipline towards a progressive interdisciplinary synthesis that goes beyond science per se. It is about science recognizing its place and proper role in the scheme of mankind’s development.  Similarly it may be about an organization coming to terms with its existence and criteria for optimal future development.

    We choose our scientific research and define the questions it is supposed to answer.  We establish mission statements for rehabilitating mental illness or corporate dysfunction, often with very specific goals in mind.  “What else” are we and those we interface with  attempting to establish and accomplish?  The “facts” are often going to be assembled within these paradigms and they may not necessarily reflect the most conscious awareness or objective reality –  remote configurations beyond our grasp.  How can we narrow the gap?

    At this point in the history and philosophy of science and other related venues, we are often offered perspectives that suggest reality often accommodates or even resembles the fabric of our individual and collective beliefs, motivations, plans and actions.  Through manifestations of being, we influence the pathways of particles, give life or death vibes to plants and even ice crystals.   The lasting impression most of us have is that the smartest and wisest among us are limited human beings who have made excellent cases for their impressions, perceptions, inferences and beliefs.  In virtually every case, the sands of time have worn down at least some of what they offered and often they have been found inadequate or have been quietly forgotten.

      How often do we look at the big picture on a philosophical level, really studying and thinking deeply?  How often do we ‘strategically modify’ our orientations to “adapt” to the expectations of individuals who themselves are not well invested in an optimal mission or purpose in their own leadership?  This book offers a number of windows, as remote as prime matter and as close to home as conscience to better understand and construct a model of ourselves and those we serve — what are we about anyway?  What are we made of and how do we best develop?  What should be our own “developmental agendas” and those we affirm in others? 

END OF NOTES PART I OF 2

Please note that this book contains a “working Glossary” for the reader to glance through before and during reading…

GO TO NOTES PART 2 of 2

“Interdisciplinary studies has positioned itself as an innovative approach to comprehending, navigating, and transforming knowledge. The emphasis in recent scholarship upon complex systems and integration of insights from disciplinary perspectives mark decisive progress toward the development of a cohesive theory of interdisciplinarity. Such a theory would entail establishing an epistemology of complexity through epistemological negotiation. I argue that the interdisciplinary approach to knowledge is a logical evolution of the history of Western thought…(p. 1).”

Welch (2011).  The Emergence of Interdisciplinarity From Epistemological Thought.  Issues in Integrative Studies. No. 29, pp. 1-39.  

SERVICES

Contracting For

Online  College Teaching

Speaking

Consulting

Web Conferencing

 

BEING AND SYSTEMS COURSE UNDER DEVELOPMENT.

Sign up on contact form above to be notified.

Preface Part II: Being Becoming: Integrative Paradigms For Developmental Metaphysics

BEING BECOMING

NOTES (PART II)

BEING BECOMING: PARADIGMS FOR INTERDISCIPLINARY ONTOLOGY

Richard Waguespack, Ph.D., LCSW

     Many great thinkers in contemporary neurology such as Michael Gazzaniga, author of Who’s in Charge, play to a middle ground in recognizing mind-body perspectives that propose an interface between animate and inanimate domains of being.  He does this by expanding the parameters of “emergence theory” that has traditionally been quite nebulous and somewhat adversarial to recognizing dimensions outside the physical and quantum.  His evident strategy is to give the reader much empirical evidence about the nature of the brain and human decision making within scientific parameters explained through interactive systems theory and offering a blurry olive branch; some semblance of a separate ‘mind’ sustained in whole greater than the sum of its parts.  Though he may vaguely signal this is metaphysical or spiritual there is no clear cut alliance with this position.

    Gazzaniga appeals to a sustained quantum complexity – akin to recognizing two separate properties in mind-body distinction, but not acknowledging two distinct domains (material and spiritual).  This is known as property dualism rather than substance dualism as traditionally defined by Cartesian theorists.  Cartesian dualism states that man has a body and a soul and each of is composed of a separate substance.  Those with this orientation weigh the value of a neurological theory by the level of accommodation.  

     Property dualism is a half-mast sail for those who do not want to alienate either side of the Cartesian dualism debate.  Now having made this point, the limitations and problems with Cartesian dualism are addressed in this book – but the remedies do not migrate in the direction of monism or property dualism.  More broadly, coexistence or functional alignment between the animate and inanimate components of being are at the heart of the Three Essence Paradigm (or Theory), a perspective that is developed in this publication.  The nature of this relationship is something that will require many people many years to further explore, expand and clarify.  What can be established from the onset is that the notion of substance, more than the constructs it was meant to cover in Cartesian Dualism must be reexamined for efficacy given certain issues in Western Philosophy and Christian Theology. 

     Unfamiliar with the approach of this book, Gazzaniga, primarily a property dualist, explains that the “whole” is greater (and of different status and quality) than the sum of its parts, substitutes the mind for the whole and the parts for components of physiology.   To cap it off, he vaguely alludes to ‘possibly more’ while at the same time elusively allowing room from the scientific community to retain long held, insular, materialist assumptions that some believe should be stripped out to make room for more valid and holistic interdisciplinary models.  At the same time, Gazzaniga avoids explicitly diminishing the merit of orientations of those who see how quantum mechanics opens the door to a more holistic view that may in some manner be construed to incorporate the metaphysical and spiritual essence of humans integrated with their physical nature or body.

     In some ways, The Being Becoming Series goes beyond the work of Gazzaniga and others (many more accustomed to even more reductionist models) to explore cohesive interpretations that interface the physical, quantum, morphic, metaphysical and spiritual when addressing the physiology and overall functioning of humans.  Chapter one of the first publication is thus aptly titled Physiology Reframed.

     Because our world continues to increase in both complexity and wholesale automation that invades individual autonomy and decision making, the basic structures, systems and processes that once enabled individuals and organizations to get from point A to point B to point C, may paradoxically be overly effective and frighteningly inadequate at the same time. This is especially true if certain core understandings and principles are missing from goals and objectives.  The runaway train stays on track and has brakes, but is also very dangerous and out of control.  The same may be said of certain kinds of scientific research.

     Many more gaps and much dissonance may appear when relying on old strategies combined with new technologies to advance to points D, E and F.  Again, lack of knowledge and false  (or reductionistic) assumptions about the nature of being and potential as well as underestimating the extent of erosion and moral change that we are called upon to embrace, can and will affect the relative thresholds of success and failure of work environments.

   The goals of an organization can be well formulated in terms of service and outcome, but without a cultural shift to support ongoing openness to new and better modes of being, the mindful practice of high receptivity to other kinds of information and flexibility for change may in and of itself be insufficient to bring the group through the jungle one year and the desert the next. Principles founded upon improved interpretations of humans and the human condition are required to filter knowledge and assemble the best model for mission, goals, objectives and outcomes.

    Just because we are now understanding the brain to be far more plastic than hard wired, does not mean we properly understand what constitutes the person who uses the brain.  In fact, such advanced understanding in isolation can easily yield to strategies that involve unprecedented abuse and unethical manipulation.  This is especially true for those committed to incorporating a materialist view of being and existence.

   Nimble capacity when one’s understanding of “the meaning” and content for “the mission” is inadequate creates barriers to discovering and acting upon the best vision, navigation and criteria for success.  Those scrambling to be ’orchestrators’ instead of ‘orchestrees’ need to possess the character and vision necessary to avoid nihilistic “group think” processes that may offer hollow confirmation to “the boss”.  They need to understand what constitutes their own being as well as variables that signal deficits in process and formation.

     An inferior or deficient mission grabs for external alliance and loyalty and mechanistically creates sparks simulating but not equaling the holistic success and honor many of us seek.  In the words of Sinclair Lewis in Rebel From Main Street,  we may cynically reach to accomplish without adequate assessment of goals or authentic internal validation. “What is success, but the paper helmet of a clown, more nimble than his fellows, scrambling for a peanut in the dust of an ignoble circus” (p. 490). 

Similarly, the need for deeper thinking along with self reflection in managers is explained well by Cecile Rozuel (2010):   

Successful modern managers are pictured as capable of adapting both from experience and from a knowledge-database to respond effectively and efficiently to the issues and prospects of
business (Hannagan, 2005).  On the moral front, however, successful managers need to develop
a propensity to self reflect.  They equally need to adapt less to circumstances and instead favour
the expression of their self.  Failure to do so does not make managers necessarily wrong in ethical terms but it certainly makes them much more susceptible to fail morally in the course of their job.

 

    As we work towards advancing the noble and quelling the ignoble in our sphere of influence, our vulnerabilities to demands from authority, even if discernibly irrational, are formidable.  Consider the ramifications of being in automated compliance as demonstrated by the well circulated video known  as The Waiting Room Experiment.  In our technical age with sound and visual signals for various kinds of automated delivery and conformity, peer and supervisory pressure combined with advanced tools in many domains place us at an every increasing risk of losing our voice and collegial interface with co-workers and often more distanced leaders.  The of course greatly integers with trust and investment in problem solving collaboration.

     Being Becoming recognizes that a person or group’s state of being will definitely influence the capacity for steering the ship away from atrophy, entropy and apathy and towards sustaining cohesive progress towards worthy long term goals and objectives.  While this volume of Being Becoming may not exist in the form of a throughly practical “how to” business manual, it provides a helpful framework for the reader to better conceptualize the “a-priori” “what is” before the “how to“.

     Being Becoming was written to provide a backdrop of information for other theorists in various disciplines to  more universally and ‘natively’ connect with their own being, ideas and their potential applications.  With the right priorities, they will also be involved in producing a more complete synthesis for leadership to consider when appraising “what is”, both actual and potential.  Identifying and explaining our core components on a metaphysical level – essence and potential in being as well as problems with optimal integration of self is certainly near the top of the list.

     It has often been said that “the world is shrinking”.  What we mean by this statement continues to evolve. At a minimum, it certainly entails the reality that an ever increasing constellation of “systems” will exist in closer and closer proximity to one another — quite possibly with collateral influence that is “felt” with  greater regularity and intensity.  Ultimately, some components will function in ways which will demand constructive coexistence. 

     When one focuses on new content suitable for inclusion in various systems theories and mainstream paradigms of science, technology, psychology, medicine, education, social work, human resources, and management, a “growth odyssey” of considerable magnitude at many different levels unfolds.  In putting this Series together, applications for a much larger context of interdisciplinary studies aligned with Ontology  the study of being emerges.  I believe that a significant number of people are motivated towards interdisciplinary exchanges directed towards central conduit(s) containing built in filters and scaffolds to generate increasingly holistic paradigms for universal applications.

    Being Becoming offers paradigms to unify great people, causes and modes of inquiry with both concrete and abstract references to the nature of reality.  Though the challenges involved in bringing this synthesis to the “center of operations” are formidable, if they were any easier they would already be in place, it would not take great leaders to understand and facilitate them.

     As we transition into a third 21st century decade, we can expect to see a flow dynamic partnerships, mergers, buyouts and other alliances, not just of corporate bodies, but of functional ideologies and metaphysical assumptions. If we head in the right direction, professions and disciplines will practice more effective collaboration because a shared epistemology and ontology will make it more possible to consciously formulate overlapping objectives with shared assumptions to foster constructive processes.  It will often be through interdisciplinary channels governed by these modalities that accomplished minds will gather to formulate constructive innovations and platforms to accomplish them.  

     Who is going to be early (or late) for the “Ontology Gathering”?  Who is not aware that while modern enterprise is becoming “smarter”, more technologically savvy and powerful, the possibility of nefarious assumptions and destructive ideologies taking root and molesting the service,  product or peripheral realities increases?  It takes a new additions to nomenclature and alliance with multiple disciplines oriented towards the higher good to sufficiently move frameworks, support and navigation in the best way for the good of all.

     Near the open of a recent podcast, Being The Change: Episode 214, Lewis Howes (2015) asked, “Have you ever stopped to think what it means to be human? We have so much power yet haven’t quite mastered responsibility to ourselves, or our home, the earth, or her other inhabitants.” I believe Ontology and related venues are almost unavoidably going to be primary catalysts behind corporate and multidisciplinary developments in the future.  These should foster greater trust for sustainability of missions over more narrow definitions of ‘performance’ within specific contexts that often possess very short life spans. 

    Since constant change and need to innovate and adjust will be accelerated, creative potential will become more valued in many settings.  Advancing a compatible, epistemology, metaphysics and ontology is the key for innovators to focus on ’operationalization’ within the context of “mutuality in being”.

     At this juncture it is fitting to revisit the introductory thoughts of Edith Stein in Finite and Eternal Being. Posthumously published within one of the most pivotal epochs in the history of Western Philosophy, we find the following declaration:  “This is a book by a beginner for beginners.”  I certainly wish to echo those same sentiments for the publications of this Series. A certain kind of simplicity and humility is required for gathering many to further process and prioritize their understanding of this less than fully definitive material.

  By embracing her quest in the right spirit, in her humble acknowledgment, Stein was saying that her efforts do not equate to absolute truth, but will hopefully draw the reader to the right proximity of content relevant to the new frontier of constructing emerging and traditional fields of thought for mankind’s advancement in the greater good. This is my position as well.  There is a market for modernized work of this nature and I feel privileged to participate in it.           

END OF PREFACE PART 2 OF 2

Please note that this book contains a “working Glossary” for the reader to glance through before and during reading…   

Developmental Metaphysics: Reframing Medicine and Psychology

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As I work to publish Being Becoming: Integrative Paradigms it is becoming evident that Three Essence Theory and other constructs discussed cross a major threshold.  No longer the offspring of any single discipline, they have taken on a unique, interdisciplinary quality – “integrative paradigms” in service of Developmental Metaphysics.  This may call for a change in the title:  Being Becoming: Integrative Paradigms For Developmental Metaphysics.

Observers may say that advanced phenomenology and at least some forms of existentialism could also be classified as Developmental Metaphysics and they may have a point.  However, I have never encountered material that described these fields in those terms even though that may have been the less than fully conscious intent of some thinkers. Perhaps it is more accurate to say these venues were precursors to Developmental Metaphysics.

I offer Developmental Metaphysics as an emerging subfield set up to integrate select components of various disciplines within the context and nomenclature of Metaphysics and modern Epistemology of Interdisciplinarity.

It is through this corridor that medicine, psychology, social work, occupational therapy, systems theory in business and other venues can be both enriched and guided on a path that is more in sync with the Judeo-Christian foundations of western society.  There is also room for careful and selective integration of experience and knowledge from sources outside this framework that do not contradict the core foundations..

The power of Developmental Metaphysics is its capacity to field an interdisciplinary mission, that is, to tether the less abstract constructs from other disciplines to a higher order of thought developed to guide and sustain them in an optimal way.  This includes nurturing a pedagogical and practice mindset that is not prone to be oppressed by approaches in Philosophy, Science, Medicine and Psychology that discount the existence of realities outside of three dimensions or the need for adequate Ontological, Moral and Spiritual reference.

Conversely, the mission is to create concepts, constructs, theories and paradigms so powerful as to eclipse and subordinate those approaches traditionally imposed by materialists and to selectively supplant them in favor of more holistic and relevant frames of reference.   In addition, Developmental Metaphysics is a sustainable platform to offer improvements to long existing constructs such as Cartesian Dualism in a way which does not throw the baby out with the bathwater.  Soon to be published, Being Becoming: Integrative Paradigms [For Developmental Metaphysics] takes on this challenge by offering some new concepts to reconstruct entrenched fabrics no longer amenable to a broader integration helpful to Theology and other disciplines.

In sum, we can begin by contemplating Developmental Metaphysics with the following tenants:

1.  Best understood as a distinctly interdisciplinary field with unique scope and frames of reference.

2.  Requires reference to Ontology. 

3.  Must meet certain litmus tests of reason, cohesion and epistemological integrity.

4.  Requires an understanding of the quest for advanced performance, spiritual, intellectual, social and emotional growth, as well as the rationale supporting aspiration and achievement.

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“The word ‘metaphysics’ is derived from a collective title of the fourteen books by Aristotle that we currently think of as making up Aristotle’s Metaphysics. Aristotle himself did not know the word. (He had four names for the branch of philosophy that is the subject-matter of Metaphysics: ‘first philosophy’, ‘first science’, ‘wisdom’, and ‘theology’.) At least one hundred years after Aristotle’s death, an editor of his works (in all probability, Andronicus of Rhodes  titled those fourteen books “Ta meta ta phusika”—“the after the physicals” or “the ones after the physical ones”—the “physical ones” being the books contained in what we now call Aristotle’s Physics.”

van Inwagen, Peter and Sullivan, Meghan. (Spring, 2018). “Metaphysics”, The Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy. Edward N. Zalta (ed.).  Retrieved from https://plato.stanford.edu/archives/spr2018/entries/metaphysics.

Preface Part I: Being Becoming: Integrative Paradigms For Developmental Metaphysics

BEING BECOMING NOTES (Part I) BEING BECOMING: INTEGRATIVE PARADIGMS CONSTRUCTS FOR INTERDISCIPLINARY ONTOLOGY Facebook Linkedin Twitter Richard Waguespack, Ph.D., LCSW Home Waguespack Seminars Being Becoming: Posts Ontology Purchase Being Becoming Social Media Facebook LinkedIn Twitter About Richard Privacy Policy      Few argue against fuller explanations about what constitutes our being and purpose.  Being Becoming explores the conditions of our essence and potential and dynamics of existence influencing our self-concept, goals, mission, volition, and the way we participate

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Who’s Changing The Meaning?

Subscribe For New Posts * indicates required Email Address * First Name Last Name Richard S. Waguespack, Ph.D., LCSW BOOK REVIEW by Richard Waguespack, Ph.D., LCSW Pope, Dana Lynn (2017-05-05). Who’s Changing the Meaning?  Dana Lynn Pope, LLC. Kindle Edition. In Who’s Changing the Meaning?, Dana Pope explains in striking clarity the importance of integrity in language and its relationship to what is at stake in western civilization.  While meanings do expand and multiply over

Read More »

Preface Part I: Being Becoming: Integrative Paradigms For Developmental Metaphysics

BEING BECOMING NOTES (Part I) BEING BECOMING: INTEGRATIVE PARADIGMS CONSTRUCTS FOR INTERDISCIPLINARY ONTOLOGY Facebook Linkedin Twitter Richard Waguespack, Ph.D., LCSW Home Waguespack Seminars Being Becoming: Posts Ontology Purchase Being Becoming Social Media Facebook LinkedIn Twitter About Richard Privacy Policy      Few argue against fuller explanations about what constitutes our being and purpose.  Being Becoming explores the conditions of our essence and potential and dynamics of existence influencing our self-concept, goals, mission, volition, and the way we participate

Read More »

THE FUTURE OF COACHING: Come Out From The Shallows

NEW LIFE COACHING Image already added     Cordell, OK 73632 Image already added     THE FUTURE OF COACHING Come Out From The Shallows Where Will The New “Developmental Pioneers” Come From? What Will Be Their Priorities? Image already added     Facebook Linkedin Twitter Google-plus Instagram Dribbble Envelope Snapshots of “coaching” through the ages may invoke images of a prehistoric father teaching his son how to hunt, travel through difficult terrain, detect and react to danger

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Dialog: On Unbelievably High Opioid Use in the US

Richard S. Waguespack, Ph.D., LCSW Dialog: On Unbelievably High Opioid Use in the US Richard S. Waguespack, Ph.D., LCSW Keith LePage, Ph.D. More than a third of US adults prescribed opioids in 2015   WOW!!!   :   [ Compare to SOMA in Brave New World.  Also see articles and quotes at the end of this blog to verify that in the not too distant past, this guess would have been more or less correct.  Also note

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Preface Part II: Being Becoming: Integrative Paradigms For Developmental Metaphysics

BEING BECOMING NOTES (PART II) BEING BECOMING: PARADIGMS FOR INTERDISCIPLINARY ONTOLOGY Facebook Linkedin Twitter Richard Waguespack, Ph.D., LCSW      Many great thinkers in contemporary neurology such as Michael Gazzaniga, author of Who’s in Charge, play to a middle ground in recognizing mind-body perspectives that propose an interface between animate and inanimate domains of being.  He does this by expanding the parameters of “emergence theory” that has traditionally been quite nebulous and somewhat adversarial to recognizing

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© 2018 Waguespack Seminars.  Please direct correspondence to Richard S. Waguespack, Ph.D., LCSW

A Reality Check On Commercial Medicine

BEING BECOMING

A Reality Check On Commercial Medicine

Richard Waguespack, Ph.D., LCSW

Gullibility to the claims of medicine especially when attached to commercial interests has been a mainstay of most US consumers for decades.  Perhaps the best place to begin addressing this major cavity is to make it easier for younger people to witness the health perils of their elders and understand how their lives have been shortened by the false, inflated and misleading claims of “commercial science”.

Physicians Graveling & Blair (2016) in Statin Effects on Muscle and Kidney provide a riveting reality check on statins, the same drugs we thought were too good to be true a couple of decades ago.  They cite a MedWatch record review by Hoffman that 55% percent of those who take Atorvastatin experience muscle problems that can be seriously harmful to overall health.  We are speaking of actual muscle deterioration and disability here.  Many who go off of statins report noticeable improvement soon thereafter.  

In this same article, Graveling and Blair also provide very persuasive evidence from Sissals, et. al. in 2004 that “statins caused the “abrogation of insulin action.””  A number of studies after this time validated this alarm but many others confirmed the myths and falsehood promoted by Big Pharma. Still, the prescribing habits of most physicians did not generally change a large amount until the study of Cederberg, et. al. (2015).

Here, the medical community became visibly alarmed to know: “Our population-based METSIM study including 8,749 non-diabetic individuals at baseline showed that statin therapy was associated with a 46% increase in the risk of incident diabetes after adjustment for confounding factors.”  The article goes on to address renal failure, genetic polymorphisms and other maladies highly correlated with statins.

A radical example of the vestiges of medicinal practitioners trapped in wrongful delivery of healthcare can be found in a recent article (with outstanding video) from Dr. Mercola (2016), Atrocious State of Cancer Treatment in the U.S.   It is here that he points out along with thousands of other authorities that practitioners in oncology are in bondage to very limited protocols for treatment and unable to exercise their own best judgment in using their minds to evaluate all the prospective treatments out there and recommending and facilitating the best ones, including cocktails containing numerous agents known for their curative properties.  Often drug companies, boards and other entities put great pressure on physicians to abandon effective treatments in favor of prescribing new expensive drugs that are often inferior to known treatments, many of which are very inexpensive.

Due to regulatory red tape, drug-company greed, failures in the scientific process and lack of a universal will to do what’s best for each and every patient, modern cancer care fails an unacceptable percentage of the time. As Albert Einstein said, the definition of insanity is doing the same thing over and over again and expecting different results. This describes modern cancer treatment in a nutshell (Marcela, 2016).

Mercola goes on the point out how thinking cancer patients today simply cannot naively trust their doctor but must do their own research and seek out treatments they deem best. He gives a number of examples of cancer survivors who discover effective drugs used outside the United States with great success.  He also provides great strategies for food consumption, avoiding toxins and stressors, sleep and exercise.  He gave the example of Ben Williams, Ph.D., professor emeritus of Experimental Psychology at University of California, San Diego, who no one predicted to live.  “He should be one of the statistics — 1 of the more than 15,000 people who die from glioblastoma multiforme in the U.S. every year.1”

Williams book Surviving Terminal Cancer: Clinical Trials, Drug Cocktails, and Other Treatments Your Oncologist Won’t Tell You About, details the multi-faceted strategy he used to overcome the disease. You can hear him tell his story first-hand in the film Surviving Terminal Cancer. At one interval he describes a mushroom extract that’s used routinely to treat cancer in Japan. It has zero toxicity, but it’s not even mentioned in the U.S.”

The presentation goes on to explain that once a patent expires on a drug, it’s potential to rake in major profits plummets. Drug companies typically put them aside in favor of newer, more profitable pursuits. The bottom line is those who can research multiple options for treatment do well to follow their inclinations.

How can we fail to draw the conclusion that we must approach our education and health care with holistic agendas that consider relevant insights, findings and knowledge from a wide range of sources? With so much technology before us and more on the way, we need not just a moral compass, but one that fathoms spiritual, metaphysical and quantum reality that supports participation in life with a viable and sustainable philosophy of being in Being.

We have to pay careful attention to what credible critics have to say about allopathic, osteopathic, integrative medicine and CAM and to make appropriate adjustments in accordance with our best spiritual sensitivities, intuition, conscience and reasonable objectives. There are some beliefs and practices that should never be accepted and others should be considered with caution and restraint.

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Preface Part I: Being Becoming: Integrative Paradigms For Developmental Metaphysics

BEING BECOMING NOTES (Part I) BEING BECOMING: INTEGRATIVE PARADIGMS CONSTRUCTS FOR INTERDISCIPLINARY ONTOLOGY Facebook Linkedin Twitter Richard Waguespack, Ph.D., LCSW Home Waguespack Seminars Being Becoming: Posts Ontology Purchase Being Becoming Social Media Facebook LinkedIn Twitter About Richard Privacy Policy      Few argue against fuller explanations about what constitutes our being and purpose.  Being Becoming explores the conditions of our essence and potential and dynamics of existence influencing our self-concept, goals, mission, volition, and the way we participate

Read More »

Who’s Changing The Meaning?

Subscribe For New Posts * indicates required Email Address * First Name Last Name Richard S. Waguespack, Ph.D., LCSW BOOK REVIEW by Richard Waguespack, Ph.D., LCSW Pope, Dana Lynn (2017-05-05). Who’s Changing the Meaning?  Dana Lynn Pope, LLC. Kindle Edition. In Who’s Changing the Meaning?, Dana Pope explains in striking clarity the importance of integrity in language and its relationship to what is at stake in western civilization.  While meanings do expand and multiply over

Read More »

Preface Part I: Being Becoming: Integrative Paradigms For Developmental Metaphysics

BEING BECOMING NOTES (Part I) BEING BECOMING: INTEGRATIVE PARADIGMS CONSTRUCTS FOR INTERDISCIPLINARY ONTOLOGY Facebook Linkedin Twitter Richard Waguespack, Ph.D., LCSW Home Waguespack Seminars Being Becoming: Posts Ontology Purchase Being Becoming Social Media Facebook LinkedIn Twitter About Richard Privacy Policy      Few argue against fuller explanations about what constitutes our being and purpose.  Being Becoming explores the conditions of our essence and potential and dynamics of existence influencing our self-concept, goals, mission, volition, and the way we participate

Read More »

THE FUTURE OF COACHING: Come Out From The Shallows

NEW LIFE COACHING Image already added     Cordell, OK 73632 Image already added     THE FUTURE OF COACHING Come Out From The Shallows Where Will The New “Developmental Pioneers” Come From? What Will Be Their Priorities? Image already added     Facebook Linkedin Twitter Google-plus Instagram Dribbble Envelope Snapshots of “coaching” through the ages may invoke images of a prehistoric father teaching his son how to hunt, travel through difficult terrain, detect and react to danger

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